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Making The Case For A Full-Time Strength Coach

By Tim Crowley | Wed, Jul 12

The full-time strength coach as a profession is still in its infancy. In 1988 when I graduated from college, there were only a handful of collegiate and professional strength and conditioning coaches. Little did I know that 25 years later, I would be working in this amazing, challenging field, shaping the lives of young athletes.

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5 Questions Parents Will Ask About Strength Training and How To Answer Them

By Tobias Jacobi | Mon, Jul 10

One of my major concerns when I made the move to the high school ranks after almost 15 years as a collegiate strength and conditioning coach was interacting with the parents.

I am in a unique situation: a K-12 private school. I deal with questions from parents of children at many different ages. These questions range from the routine to the very off-the-wall.

Early on in my transition, I came to realization that dealing with a parent was very similar to dealing with sport coaches. Sometimes it can be a difficult situation, and other times it can be smooth. The one thing the strength and conditioning coach must have is support from their administration. A supportive athletic director, principal, and administrative staff will be the strength and conditioning coach's best friends.

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Use This 4-Phase Summer Football Program To Peak For Game Day

By Chris Tutela | Fri, Jul 7

Ah it’s finally here! The college guys are home, all of the high school guys are finishing up school, and our summer strength and conditioning program is underway!

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Bridging The Gap: How to Return to Training Post ACL Reconstruction

By Andrew Millett PT | Fri, Jun 30

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) tears and reconstruction are very common in the world of athletics. Either you know of someone who has had their ACL reconstructed or you have yourself. (Prior to being a physical therapist, I had mine reconstructed TWICE!)

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How to Plan Volume and Intensity for Varied Training Adaptations

By Rob Van Valkenburgh | Mon, Jun 26

The governing rule for all strength and conditioning or general performance training programs is the S.A.I.D. principle. 

The S.A.I.D. principle stands for Specific Adaptations to Imposed Demands.  

Essentially, what this tells us is that the body will adapt and respond based on the specific physical demands we place upon it. Simply put, tell the body what outcome you want, and it will make the physical adaptations.

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6 Tips For Training Female Athletes

By Tim Crowley | Thu, Jun 22

Developing strong, powerful, fast, and athletic female athletes can open many doors when it comes to recruiting and collegiate athletics.

Here are some of the things I have learned from coaching hundreds of female athletes on a weekly basis. I have made many mistakes, but the following tips can help you create a culture that allows female athletes to thrive.

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5 Tips To Building Coach, Parent, and Team Belief

By Tobias Jacobi | Tue, Jun 20

Getting all those involved with your program to believe in you as a strength & conditioning coach is something that gets tougher each day. And it's something good coaches must constantly work on to develop. 

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5 Off-Season Training Mistakes That Are Keeping Your Athletes Slow, Small, and Weak [e-Book]

Slow. Small. Weak. Three words you never want to utter when talking about your team. 

If speed is king, then strength is queen and size is the spoiled prince. This trifecta is like the royal flush of on-field performance.

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5 Tips For Running A Better Summer Conditioning Program

By Dave Reynolds | Fri, Jun 9

Summer conditioning for football and other fall sports (especially down south where the weather forecast is usually the same day in and day out—hazy, humid, and 90+ degrees) can be a strength and conditioning coach’s worst nightmare.

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How To Program Olympic Lifts For Field Athletes

By Michael Barnes | Wed, Jun 7

The snatch and the clean and jerk are the two lifts used in Olympic lifting competition. They are a test of skill, power, strength, balance, flexibility, and coordination.

These movements, when incorporated appropriately, can have a high degree of impact on an athlete’s strength and power capabilities. They are preferred exercises to include in many programs for the field athlete.  

In this article, I want to review the fundamental variables and related issues when it comes to programming the Olympic lifts for the field athlete.  

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