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Injury Prevention 101: Deploying Muscle Activation, Movement Prep, and Mobility to Bulletproof Your Body

By Phil White | Wed, Apr 17


OK, let me start with a quick caveat. There is no way to eliminate completely the possibility of getting hurt. When you’re physically active, there’s always the chance that something will go awry, particularly when you are operating in an open, chaotic, and unstable environment (see: athletes playing in a game or troops on an active duty mission).

So beware of anyone claiming they can rule out the risk of getting banged up...because they’re full of crap.

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Sleep For Young Athletes

By Phil White | Wed, Mar 13

Want Your Young Athletes to Concentrate, Learn, and Stay Healthy? Sort out Their Sleep.

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The New Rules of Sleep for Athletes

By Phil White | Mon, Sep 24

For the longest time, coaches have only considered the need for their athletes to get adequate rest from the perspective of “recovery.” While you must pair this with training stimuli to get adaptation, it’s far from the only reason to prioritize sufficient slumber.

Sleep is also imperative if your clients or athletes are going to commit what they’re learning to long-term memory.

A study conducted by Matthew Walker and referenced in his excellent book Why We Sleep compared undergrads who prepared for a test over several evenings and went to bed at a reasonable time versus those who pulled a pre-exam all-nighter. The results showed that “there was a 40 percent deficit in the ability of the sleep-deprived group to cram new facts into the brain (i.e. to make new memories).”

Most of the studies on this topic have been done with classroom students, but the gym is an equally rich learning environment (and perhaps more so, particularly for kinesthetic learners). Every time an athlete does something physical, it’s an expression of skill, and each skill has an intensely cognitive component.

Simply learning a new motor pattern or honing an existing one in the gym or on the practice field is only half the job when it comes to skill acquisition and progression. For it to take, getting enough premium quality shut-eye is imperative.

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