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Improve Programming By Using A Learning Curve

By John Mackersie | Mon, Jun 11

A learning curve is defined as the advancement in apprehension of a given subject. Coaching is essentially teaching, so a better understanding of how individuals learn movements and skills is paramount. Furthermore, combining knowledge of how individuals learn and improving your technique of delivering that information creates an enhanced environment geared toward progressive learning, teaching, and - ultimately - performance.

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Cultivating Context in Your Coaching

By Kenny Kane | Mon, Apr 16

As a coach, it’s easy to be comfortable with sets, reps, work-to-rest ratios, and 1RM percentages. These are all nice, tidy numbers that are easy to keep track of. They’re a necessary requirement for designing, executing, and monitoring programs.

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How to Develop a Simple Olympic Weightlifting Program for Beginners

By Mike Dewar | Thu, Mar 29

One of the great things about being a coach is the ability to impact the lives of your athletes and clients. After the initial meet and greet with a new athlete, you are often bombarded with questions like:

  • How does your system work?
  • Is it OK for beginners?
  • What are some things a beginner needs to do to get started?
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68 Assistance Exercises for Olympic Weightlifting

By Mike Dewar | Mon, Mar 5

In this article I want to offer coaches and athletes a comprehensive approach to addressing some of the most common issues seen with developing weightlifters, CrossFit members/athletes, and general fitness and sports enthusiasts.

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Olympic Weightlifting Wisdom: Two Veteran Coaches Share Their Best Advice

By Phil White | Mon, Jan 22

As we're rolling into a new year, it can be tempting to jump on the latest training bandwagon and buy into the narrative that coaches need to keep their athletes engaged by constantly changing things up.

While there’s nothing wrong with some variety to keep things interesting and overcome plateaus, change for its own sake is directionless and most of the latest gimmicks are nothing more than flashes in the pan that will be out of fashion by this time in 2019, if not before.

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6 Snatch Variations to Improve Technique, Strength, and Stability

By Mike Dewar | Mon, Oct 16

When looking at faulty overhead stability and strength in the snatch and/or overhead squat, we typically see a wide array of issues. Sometimes it may be due to mobility (the immediate reference of everyone). But it can often be from lack of barbell awareness and placement, overhead strength, timing, and/or lack of general preparation and experience.

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Should Performance Testing Differ Between Age Groups?

By Dave Reynolds | Fri, Jul 28

As strength coaches, we are all number chasers to a point.

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Weightlifting Program Design: How To Write Beginner, Intermediate & Advanced Programs

By Michael Barnes | Fri, Jul 21

In my last article I described how to program Olympic lifts for field athletes. I want to expand on this topic and give examples of training programs that address beginner, intermediate, and advanced level athletes incorporating the Olympics lifts.   

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How To Program Olympic Lifts For Field Athletes

By Michael Barnes | Wed, Jun 7

The snatch and the clean and jerk are the two lifts used in Olympic lifting competition. They are a test of skill, power, strength, balance, flexibility, and coordination.

These movements, when incorporated appropriately, can have a high degree of impact on an athlete’s strength and power capabilities. They are preferred exercises to include in many programs for the field athlete.  

In this article, I want to review the fundamental variables and related issues when it comes to programming the Olympic lifts for the field athlete.  

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