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Train Fast, Be Fast: Tips For Building Faster Athletes

By Dr. Chris Holder | Fri, Jun 16

If you are spending all your time training straight line speed, you aren’t trying to get fast...

...unless of course, you are a track athlete. Then, by all means, continue.

But, if you are in every other sport where running speed is a major component of your competition, you need to reconsider your approach.

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4 Tips For Training The Multi-Sport Athlete

By Tim Crowley | Fri, May 26

There's a huge need for educated strength and conditioning professionals more now than ever. In the last decade we’ve seen more young athletes dedicate themselves to one sport year round, and with year round competition comes increased injury risk.

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6 Biggest Mistakes Of The High School Strength Coach

By Dave Reynolds | Wed, May 24

After twenty plus years as a strength and conditioning coach, I have probably forgotten plenty. But one thing I do know is this, “I will always remember the mistakes.”

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5 Things I Wish I Knew When I Started Coaching

By Ryan Leibreich | Fri, May 19

You can't rush growth. Lasting growth as a coaching is like using a slow cooker versus a deep fryer. It's slow and steady, kind of boring, but works everytime.

If you're committed enough to make it past your first few years as a coach, it's important to look back and reflect on what you've learned. If I could only go back in time and tell the younger version of my some of these tips, I'd like to think that I'd bypass years of development as a coach. 

So, for some of you brand new strength coaches out there, here are five things I wish I knew when I started coaching.

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Coming Full Circle: Results Over Everything

By Zach Even-Esh | Fri, Apr 14

When I began training athletes from my parents' garage, their backyard, and the local playgrounds, describing the “methods” I implemented as “raw” would be an understatement. It was free weights, stones, bodyweight, hill sprints, jumps, tree logs…

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How To Perform A Needs Analysis Before Writing Your Next Program

By Dr. Chris Holder | Mon, Apr 10

It’s the end of the season and time to go back to the drawing board. Regardless of wins and losses, every good strength coach knows there are adjustments to be made to the programming so off-season meets the needs of his or her team.

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Programming Pitfalls Roundtable: 4 Strength Coaches Share Their Opinion

We connected with leading strength coaches from the collegiate, high school, and private sectors to learn some of the common program design mistakes they've made or are seeing on a regular basis. Take some time to learn (and avoid!) these common programming pitfalls.

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Are Your Athletes Ready for a College Strength and Conditioning Program?

By Tobias Jacobi | Wed, Mar 29

I have the unique perspective of coaching at a collegiate level (15 years) and high school level (3 years). With this experience, I have worked with many young men who played or want to play at the collegiate level. One of the things that excited me about making the transition to the high school level was the ability to positively affect young men before they got to college.

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Still Using Excel Templates? Here's 6 Reasons to Use Strength and Conditioning Software

At Power Athlete, there’s a term we do not take very lightly - Limiting Factor: an inability or minimally effective component limiting performance and the development of athleticism.

As opposed to labeling weaknesses, the term ‘limiting’ provides coaches the opportunity to identify, measure, and improve. More importantly, this approach directs the coach to take an honest, complete look at their athlete, an honesty they’ll inevitably face in competition.

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5 Legit Reasons All Coaches Should Use Strength and Conditioning Software

Microsoft Excel: built for all, perfect for none. Excel has been the go to spreadsheet tool for accountants and financiers since it was first released back in the mid-1980s. Originally developed to help with number crunching and complex math formulas, a couple smart strength coaches figured out they could also use it to plan workouts fairly easily.

Excel has survived this long as the “go to” planning tool for strength coaches for one reason: it’s the way it's always been done.

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